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Only 3 days left to file to run for office!

“Be the change you want to see in the world.” I know that quote from Mahatma Gandhi is somewhat cliché but I feel that it is a great way to describe my approach to politics. 

My name is Josiah Dean and I decided to run for office at the last minute just before the November 2016 election, and I won!  I am a newly elected city council member for the city of Dufur, Oregon.

How did I do it? Well, I live in a small town and I basically just showed up. It is interesting to note that since my landslide win of 12 votes, I have come to realize that many positions in local government are filled by the people who just show up. You may live in a city where city council races might be a major campaign but there are many positions that are unopposed.

If you are interested in running for office in the May 16th Special Election, a good place to start is to visit the Pacific Green Party's Run For Office page, then check in with your local County Elections office right away.  They can tell you exactly which election districts you are in and which offices are open.  But don't delay, the deadline for filing for office is March 16th!

Even if you are not up for running for office this election, you can still help out by becoming a Supporting Member or by volunteering to help those Green candidates running in the upcoming special election.  Something to keep in mind is that your Supporting Member donation may cost you nothing (visit Oregon Political Tax Credit for full details). 

I look forward to leading my little community in the direction that I want to see. I am working with several conservative folks but by demonstrating what cooperation and good governance is, we can create positive solutions.  As a business person with progressive Green Party values, my intention is to make the changes that I can.  And so can you!

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Josiah Dean
Dufur City Council Member

Alex Polikoff's Campaign Blog

As of 24 February Alex has filed for Director (Position #2) for the Corvallis Rural Fire Protection District, a position he currently holds.  It is a 4-year term.

Green Candidate Daniel Polehn's Biography

My name is Daniel Polehn.  I was born and raised in The Dalles.  After graduating from high school I married my “adventuring buddy” Amanda.  We have three young children together.  I love seeing our kids run around the Treetop Play Park at Sorosis just like I did for so many years.  We can’t help but hop in the van to go explore the natural beauty of the gorge.
I work at the Google Data Center in town where I have been for the last 9 years.  I really enjoy the creative problem solving that comes with working in our ever changing industry.  When I’m not working or at home I enjoy swimming, cycling and running (or at least I tri).
I have a passion for preserving our community’s beauty and ensuring everyone is able to enjoy it for generations to come.  I believe we can improve the quality of life in our community through new trails and parks.  Now is a great time to do it!  For these reasons I have decided to run for the North Wasco County Parks and Recreation board.

Greens Running in 2017 Special Election

By Nick Perry-Guetti

Four Clatsop County Greens have announced their candidacy for local offices in the upcoming 2017 Special Election to be held statewide on 15 May 2017. Jacqueline DeVaney has already officially filed to run for Clatsop County Health District #3. Susana Gladwin will run for Jewell School District #8, Kindwyn Hoge for Administrative School District #10, and Bob Goldberg for Sunset Empire Transportation District.  

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You can help these candidates today by volunteering to help their campaigns or by donating to the Pacific Green Party!

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Green Candidate Daniel Polehn Announces Run for Office

I have declared my candidacy to run for my the North Wasco County Parks and Recreation board and filed with the Wasco County Clerk.

Green Candidate Kindwyn Hoge's Biography

I am a mother whose son has lived in Seaside all of his life and has attended Head Start and Seaside schools. I want to be on the Seaside school board to help volunteer, serve, and to help the schools continue to improve.

My ideas include green solutions for when the new high school is built, including solar panels to help save money on electrical bills and to progress toward cleaner energy. My other ideas include composting and garden programs for education on sustainable living and healthy living.

I oppose funneling money away from public schools in order to create charter schools. 

Green Candidate Jacqueline Devaney's Biography

My name is Jacqueline Devaney, and I will be running for Clatsop Health District position three. I have 8 1/2 years of nursing experience including the fields of home health, dialysis, and med surg, am the current Chair of the Pacific Green Party of Clatsop County chapter, and am a member of the Pacific Green Party State Coordinating Committee.

I also have experience in nursing management as a clinical coordinator at a dialysis facility, during which time my clinic experienced a crisis in turnover of staff.  I was able to train the new staff to take excellent care of the patients so that the patients' health outcomes remained high. During my time as a clinical coordinator, my clinic won an award for having one of the highest outcome measures in the region.

I am running for this position because I am passionate about members of our community, especially those who are most vulnerable and who require advocates that make decisions based on what will benefit these residents the most.

Private Sale of Elliott Forest Faces Momentary Setback

By Nick Perry-Guetti

On February 14th, in Salem, OR, the Oregon State Land Board (SLB) in a public hearing voted 2-1 for sale of the Elliot State Forest (a public land trust attached to the state’s Common School Fund (CSF), and comprising some 83,000 acres of beautiful, ecologically diverse forest rich in old growth and known to be habitat for federally threatened species) jointly to Lone Rock Timber, a private timber company, and the Cow Creek Band of the Umpqua Tribe. The SLB consists of Oregon Governor Kate Brown (D), Secretary of State Dennis Richardson (R), and Treasurer Tobias Read (D). Brown, who favors an option for continued public ownership of Elliot that still allows for logging, cast the dissenting vote. The sale is not finalized, awaiting another meeting set for April 11th.

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Action Alert Call and Rally to Save The Elliott Forest

By Nick Perry-Guetti

The State Land Board (Governor, Treasurer, and Secretary of State) needs to hear from us that Oregonians do not want the Elliott to be privatized. The Department of State Lands (DSL) released the agenda for this meeting, stating that unless the State Land Board tells the DSL to not sell the Elliott, it will be officially sold. Key talking points:

-The Elliott needs to remain in public ownership.
-The DSL is disregarding the Land Board's decision in December to look into other options.
-There are currently groups formulating alternative options for the Elliott and these should not be disregarded.
-The common school fund needs to be decoupled from the revenue of the Elliott, but not at the cost of losing our public lands

Tobias Read (State Treasurer) 503.378.4329
Dennis Richardson (Secretary of State) 503.986.1523
Kate Brown (Governor) 503.378.4582

If they don't take action this coming Tuesday 14 Feb then a sale will (unfortunately) go through.  There is a massive rally planned in Salem on Tuesday click for details.

Wear green in support of the Elliott!

CARPOOL from Coos Bay: email savetheelliott@gmail.com

CARPOOL from Corvallis: email 

 

Portlanders Flood City Hall to Testify for unanimously passed Relocation Assistance Ordinance

By Nick Perry-Guetti

On February 2nd, an Emergency Relocation Ordinance introduced by Commissioner Chloe Eudaly was unanimously passed after an approximately five-hour hearing where 118 people in addition to those formally invited to testify gave testimony, overwhelmingly in favor of the ordinance. The law requires landlords who instigate no-cause evictions must pay three months rent (actually a flat rate determined by Portland Housing Bureau [PHB] information on the average rent paid by renters whom the law would affect) in relocation assistance to the tenants.

Proponents, citing PHB data as well as much direct experience, argued that in low and moderate income households, incomes are not keeping up with rent increases. Meanwhile landlords in the city have had the right, for the last thirty years, to perform no-cause evictions: a process that bypasses many of the restrictions landlords face in ordinary evictions where they must state a cause. Moving costs around 2.5 times the average monthly income of Portland renters.  Short-term rent assistance has had only limited effect, and representatives of Human Solutions––a homeless sheltering organization that would be housing 5,000 people that night––reported that every homeless shelter which opens immediately fills, that a high percentage of those needing shelter are experiencing homelessness for the first time, and that the city is about 25,000 housing units short. Before the hearing, Commissioner Eudaly addressed a large and appreciative crowd gathered outside, citing her own experience of housing loss as a significant inspiration for crafting the ordinance.

The hearing had an impressive attendance. The two-floor hearing room at City Hall quickly filled, and attendees not giving testimony were obliged themselves to relocate to the nearby Portland Building to watch the proceedings via live stream in an equally packed auditorium. The overall atmosphere was of strong support for the ordinance; though some testimony expressed concerns that the law might create difficulties for landlords in some circumstances, or that the law does not go far enough to assuage the housing crisis and that overturning a current ban on rent control remains necessary. Proponents, including commissioner Eudaly, responded that landlords’ difficulties did not outweigh those of tenants, but the Commission did craft a number of amendments to the law excusing landlords under certain circumstances; they also agreed that the ordinance was only an emergency stopgap measure to arrest the sharp increase in homelessness, and that the ban on rent control was a major cause of conflict and should be reexamined. In the meantime, to avoid difficulties, landlords are encouraged to reconsider no-cause evictions unless absolutely necessary.